General Site Information
Site ID:CA-SF3
Site Name:Saskatchewan - Western Boreal, forest burned in 1998
Tower Team: PI: Brian Amiro <Brian_Amiro@umanitoba.ca> - University of Manitoba; Canadian Forest Service
Latitude:54.0916
Longitude:-106.0053
Elevation (m):540
NetworkAmeriFlux, Fluxnet-Canada
IGBP:OSH (Open Shrublands)
Climate Koeppen:Dfc (Subarctic: severe winter, no dry season, cool summer)
Mean Annual Temperature (degrees C):0.4
Mean Annual Precipitation (mm):470
Data Products: AmeriFlux BASE Dataset
FLUXNET2015 Dataset
FLUXNET LaThuile Dataset
Data Availability: AmeriFlux BASE:   6 years (Duration: 2001 - 2006)
FLUXNET2015:   6 years (Duration: 2001 - 2006)
FLUXNET LaThuile:   3 years (Duration: 2003 - 2005)
Data Downloads to Date: AmeriFlux BASE:   154 unique downloads
FLUXNET2015:   517 unique downloads
FLUXNET LaThuile:   237 unique downloads
Data DOIs: AmeriFlux BASE DOI: 10.17190/AMF/1246008
Description:The 1998 burn site (F98) was in the east part of Prince Albert National Park, Saskatchewan, in the Waskesiu Fire, ignited by lightning that burned about 1700 ha in July 1998. The pre-fire forest consisted of jack pine and black spruce stands, with some intermixed aspen. The fire was severe, consuming much of the top layer of organic soil and killing all trees. In 2001, much of the regenerating vegetation consisted of aspen saplings about 1 m tall and shorter jack pine and black spruce seedlings. An overstory of dead, leafless jack pine trees dominated at a height of 18 m. Sparse grass and herbs, such as fireweed (Epilobium angustifolium L.) covered the ground. There were a large number of fallen dead trees, mostly perched above the ground and not decomposing quickly.
Acknowledgments:The data collection was funded by the Canadian Forest Service (Natural Resources Canada) and by Parks Canada as part of the BERMS (Boreal Ecosystem Research and Monitoring Sites) initiative in collaboration with the Fluxnet Canada Research Network and the Canadian Carbon Program (supported by the Canadian National Science and Engineering Research Council (NSERC), the Canadian Foundation for Climate and Atmospheric Sciences and the BIOCAP Canada Foundation).
Site image(s):
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Publications relevant to understanding the site
BibliographyUsage
Amiro, B.D. 2009. Measuring boreal forest evapotranspiration using the energy balance residual. Journal of Hydrology 366: 112-118. Reference
Amiro, B.D. 2010. Estimating annual carbon dioxide eddy fluxes using open-path analysers for cold forest sites. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 150:1366-1372. Reference
Amiro, B.D.  2001. Paired-tower measurements of carbon and energy fluxes following disturbance in the boreal forest.  Global Change Biology 7, 253-268. Reference
Amiro, B.D., A.G. Barr, J.G. Barr, T.A. Black, R. Bracho, M. Brown, J. Chen, K.L. Clark, K.J. Davis, A.R. Desai, S. Dore, V. Engel, J.D. Fuentes, A.H. Goldstein, M.L. Goulden, T.E. Kolb, M.B. Lavigne, B.E. Law, H.A. Margolis, T. Martin, J.H. McCaughey, L. Misson, M. Montes-Helu, A. Noormets, J.T. Randerson, G. Starr, and J. Xiao. 2010. Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in forests of North America. J. Geophys. Res. 115, G00K02, doi:10.1029/2010JG001390. Reference
Amiro, B.D., A.G. Barr, T.A. Black, H. Iwashita, N. Kljun, J.H. McCaughey, K. Morgenstern, S. Murayama, Z. Nesic, A.L. Orchansky, and N. Saigusa. 2006.  Carbon, energy and water fluxes at mature and disturbed forest sites, Saskatchewan, Canada.  Agric. For. Meteorol. 136, 237-251. Reference
Amiro, B.D., A.L. Orchansky, A.G. Barr, T.A. Black, S.D. Chambers, F.S. Chapin III, M.L. Goulden, M. Litvak, H.P. Liu, J.H. McCaughey, A. McMillan and J.T. Randerson.  2006. The effect of post-fire stand age on the boreal forest energy balance.  Agric. For. Meteorol. 140, 41-50 Reference
Amiro_et_al_2006, AFM/136:...The 1998 burn site (F98) was in the east part of Prince Albert National Park, Saskatchewan, in the Waskesiu Fire, ignited by lightning that burned about 1700 ha in July 1998. The pre-fire forest consisted of jack pine and black spruce stands, with some intermixed aspen. The fire was severe, consuming much of the top layer of organic soil and killing all trees. In 2001, much of the regenerating vegetation consisted of aspen saplings about 1 m tall and shorter jack pine and black spruce seedlings. An overstory of dead, leafless jack pine trees dominated at a height of 18 m. Sparse grass and herbs, such as fireweed (Epilobium angustifolium L.) covered the ground. There were a large number of fallen dead trees, mostly perched above the ground and not decomposing quickly. Reference
B. D. Amiro; J. I. MacPherson; R. L. Desjardins; J. M. Chen; J. Liu. 2003. Post-fire carbon dioxide fluxes in the western Canadian boreal forest: evidence from towers, aircraft and remote sensingAgricultural and Forest Meteorology. 115:1-2, 91-107. Reference
M. B. Rayment; P. G. Jarvis. 1999. Seasonal gas exchange of black spruce using an automatic branch bag systemCanadian Journal of Forest Research-Revue Canadienne De Recherche Forestiere. 29:10, 1528-1538. Reference
M.S. Mkhabela, B.D. Amiro, A.G. Barr, T.A. Black, I. Hawthorne, J. Kidston, J.H. McCaughey, A.L. Orchansky, Z. Nesic, A. Sass, A. Shashkov and T. Zha. 2009. Comparison of carbon dynamics and water use efficiency following fire and harvesting in Canadian boreal forests. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 149: 783-794. Primary_Citation
M.S. Mkhabela, B.D. Amiro, A.G. Barr, T.A. Black, I. Hawthorne, J. Kidston, J.H. McCaughey, A.L. Orchansky, Z. Nesic, A. Sass, A. Shashkov and T. Zha. 2009. Comparison of carbon dynamics and water use efficiency following fire and harvesting in Canadian boreal forests. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 149: 783-794. Primary_Citation

These pages show the current information available at http://ameriflux.lbl.gov about this tower.
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